Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS
Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS Manhattan Lost Buildings 17x22" Art Print by Raymond Biesinger | touchGOODS
$ 50.00
Materials

Epson Ultrachrome K3 ink, Epson Ultra Premium Matte paper

Dimensions

Height: 22 Inches; Width: 17 Inches

This is a 19-point chart showing Manhattan buildings of architectural, cultural, or social importance, all of which were bulldozed, destroyed, or burned out of existence between 1902 and 2017. It was impossible to include every building I would've liked, but here's what it does include: names, facades, years standing, and dozens of hours of research and illustration. 

Printed in an open edition via Epson Stylus Pro 3880 at 17x22" on Epson Ultra Premium 192 GSM Enhanced Matte paper. Dimensions include a 0.5" margin. Signed and dated on reverse. This print is archival.

Included in the image: 

1. Lenox Lounge (1939-2017, regulars included John Coltrane, Billy Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, and Malcolm X)

2. Heins and Bolet (1921-1966, one of the first shops in “Radio Row,” all of which were demolished for the World Trade Center)

3. Studebaker Building (1902-2004, on the north end of Times Square at 1600 Broadway, previously a Studebaker showroom and birthplace of Columbia Pictures)

4. Penn Station (1910-1963, its demolition was a turning point in the American building preservation movement)

5. Unity Synagogue (1928-1984, a Byzantine synagogue demolished and replaced by apartments)

6. All Angel's Church (1890-1979, a neo-Gothic gem with a two-and-a-half storey Tiffany window, demolished for apartments)

7. Singer Building (1908-1968, dominated the NYC skyline for sixty years, the tallest building to ever be purposely demolished by its owner)

8. Luchow's Restaurant (1882-1995, the German-American restaurant of choice for early 20th century creative-types and celebrities)

9. Bowery Theater (1845-1929, a playhouse on the Bowery and Lower East Side, reincarnated several times after several fires)

10. New York World Building (1890-1955, also known as the “Pulitizer Building” after its owner, Joseph Pulitzer)

11. World Trade Center 1-2 (1973-2001)

12. Second Tammany Hall (1868-1927, a political center, entertainment complex, bar, bazaar, and cafe at 141 East 14th Street)

13. Pagoda Theater (1963-1992, a cross between modern Chinese style and kitsch by architect Poy Gum Lee)

14. Madison Square Gardens III (1925-1968, original home of the New York Rangers, the first Madison Square Gardens not located on Madison Square)

15. the Tombs (1838-1902, the first of four Manhattan municipal jails with that nickname)

16. Manny's Music (1920s-2017, where Paul Simon bought his first guitar at age 12, visited by the Beatles, Bowie, Jagger, Hendrix, Holly, etc.)

17. Dvorak House (1852-1991, home of Czechoslovak composer Antonin Dvorak when he composed 'From the New World”)

18. the Ritz Carlton (1917-1951, the first Ritz Carlton hotel, set the service standard of luxury circa WWI)

19. Savoy Ballroom (1926-1959, a legendary swing-era Harlem ballroom that hosted Fess Williams, Chick Webb, and Teddy Hill)